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Want One of These in YOUR Backyard?

March 11, 2011

TOKYO — Japan declared states of emergency for five nuclear reactors at two power plants after the units lost cooling ability in the aftermath of Friday’s powerful earthquake. Thousands of residents were evacuated as workers struggled to get the reactors under control to prevent meltdowns.

Japan earthquake Hundreds dead after quake, tsunami slam Japan
Updated 33 minutes ago 3/12/2011 1:03:30 AM +00:00 Nearly 24 hours after a massive earthquake struck Japan, unleashing a 23-foot tsunami that swept hundreds to their death, rescuers fanned out Saturday morning to search for survivors and victims.

.Updated 0 minutes ago 3/12/2011 1:37:05 AM +00:00 Emergencies declared at 5 Japan nuclear reactors
Japan’s earthquake: How to help
Early hero of Japan’s quake tragedy: Building codes
Updated 75 minutes ago 3/12/2011 12:21:14 AM +00:00 Japan braces for economic aftershocks
Watch as destruction unfolds in Japan
Updated 30 minutes ago 3/12/2011 1:07:04 AM +00:00 Video shows chaotic moments during Japan’s 8.9 magnitude earthquake and the destruction caused by a powerful tsunami that hit the island nation Friday.

. Japan’s tsunami awes even the experts
Science editor Alan Boyle’s Weblog: Seismic experts have long known that Japan’s complex undersea fault system can unleash great waves, but this one was the most violent tsunami to hit the nation in the past century.

. Massive earthquake hits Japan
An 8.9-magnitude quake triggers tsunami, causing enormous damage.
…Operators at the Fukushima Daiichi plant’s Unit 1 scrambled ferociously to tamp down heat and pressure inside the reactor after the 8.9 magnitude quake and the tsunami that followed cut off electricity to the site and disabled emergency generators, knocking out the main cooling system.

7 comments

  1. No, thank you. But:

    House GOP Eyes Cuts to Pacific Tsunami Warning Center

    http://www.washingtonmonthly.com/archives/individual/2011_03/028397.php


  2. LOL – the GOP are idiots – but folks are beginning to notice.

    Nukes were beginning to make a comeback – but this incident should finish them off for the good. They are a horrid idea. Using fuel that is both highly toxic and deadly radioactive – in reactors that are intrinsicly unsafe. DUH. Call me back when there are nukes which just politly shut down when all control, power, and utilities are cut off. Won’t happen.

    Yes I did know about flyash. Wind is nontoxic as long as folks don’t dump stuff into it.


    • Dog, what do you know about the feasibility of reactors that use thorium for fuel instead of uranium or plutonium?

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thorium_fuel_cycle#Disadvantages_as_nuclear_fuel


    • I’m not a nuclear expert at all. Thought about taking a course in university – we were not that far from Hanford. Thought better of it. Did not want to be involved. You would think if anyone would be careful about nukes it would be the Japanese – not careful enough – no thanks.


    • Did you know that fly ash from coal generating plants is more radioactive than nuclear waste?

      http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=coal-ash-is-more-radioactive-than-nuclear-waste

      I often drive near the GRDA’s coal generating plant in Chouteau. Google Earth seems to show an area on the grounds of the plant that is a huge fly ash dump. I can’t get a straight answer from GRDA about what it does with its fly ash. I hope that a dam doesn’t burst someday and release all that toxic stuff into the watershed, like happened a while back in Tennessee to a TVA fly ash deposit.

      There is a constant stream of 100-car coal trains heading south on the tracks along Highway 69 between Adair and Chouteau, bringing in “clean” coal from Wyoming.

      I don’t want a coal generating plant in my back yard either.


  3. I think having FRESH water for a million people in the next couple of weeks will top this one. Think about it.. then you will have CHOLERA to mess with..

    In addition to the economic fall out.. on a Global Scale..


    • …there are about 1.8 Billion people who lack clean water.
      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Drinking_water
      I had a real lesson in that in Cambodia where most in the rural areas had no indoor plumbing at all. The facilities were a pipe near the fence. Or the folks living in floating villages where they pooped into the water – and many drank it.
      Even in the overly fancy hotel we stayed at they warned us about the water. Tea, coffee, bottled water tyvm.
      Saw a floating water station paid for by USAID that sold cheap clean water.

      The pdf in this link is very eye opening:

      http://rc.racha.org.kh/docDetails.asp?resourceID=358&categoryID=81



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